10.26.2016

Kimonos from Okinawa

Ryukyu Bingata | 琉球紅型

Developed in the 15th century, Bingata is the only traditional dyeing method unique to Okinawa. It consists of two different techniques, namely, stencil dyeing and cylinder drawing. Bingata is colorfully hand dyed on cotton, silk, banana fiber cloth, etc., using pigment and vegetable dyes. There is also Aigata, which is a dip dyeing technique using Ryukyu indigo. Each style has its own elegant charm.

Producer’s association: Ryukyu Bingata Business Cooperative

OG2016_Okinawa_Kimono01

 

踊衣裳・打掛 | Bingata women’s dance costume “Uchikake (robe)”

Kimono
Year made : 2006
Maker : –

Technique: Stencil dyeing
Fabric : Silk (silk crepe)
Certificate: National Traditional Crafts

This kimono is a restoration of the Bingata dance costume from the Ryukyu Kingdom era. Its design is recognized as a classical design for queens’ garments. Yellow was considered a royal color that symbolizes the Ryukyu dynasty. Apart from dance costumes, yellow could only be used for garments worn by kings and queens. The sober and calming aigata, on the other hand, uses dark and light indigo shades to form the dye patterns and was commonly worn by ordinary people.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National

OG2016_Okinawa_Obi01

菱霞牡丹(絹布金糸入綸子) 全通帯黒 | Peony on Hishigasumi (Silk satin damask with golden thread)

Zentsu-obi Obi
Year made : 2014
Maker: Yafuso Bingata Studio

Technique: Stencil dyeing
Fabric: Silk (Gold threads), satin damask
Certificate: Okinawa Prefecture Bingata Inspection Certification

The bold peony pattern of shining red vermillion color starkly contrasts against the glittering black background, a color that is highly unusual in Bingata textiles. Accentuated by golden threads woven into the gorgeous design of this obi, it functions as a furisode, or, a formal kimono with long sleeves worn by unmarried women.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.

Bingata refers to Okinawa’s unique traditional dying pattern, which was first established 300 years ago. The bingata is now known by the bright, colorful bingata which was originally only permitted to be worn by royal or noble families. The sober, calming aigata which uses dark and light indigo shades to form the dye patterns was commonly worn by ordinary people. In this exhibition, we will introduce the bright, colorful bingata which was worn as an extravagant dance costume and was created in the image of a bridal robe worn by the queen of the Ryukyu Kingdom.

 


Kijyoka Bashofu | 喜如嘉芭蕉布

Dating back to the 13th century, Kijoka Banana Fiber textile is produced by hand-spinning thread made from the bark of the ito basho banana tree. Kasuri thread is hand bundled, dyed with plant dyes such as Ryukyu indigo and yeddo hawthorn, then woven into cloth. This style of weaving is unique to Okinawa and has been valued by Okinawans since ancient times for its smooth, light texture. During the Ryukyu Kingdom, Basho-fu was the material most central to people’s lives, worn not only as the daily clothing of commoners but on special occasion garments worn by royal families and nobles as well. Some basho-fu garments were made using colored threads or hana-ori techniques. In 1974, the Kijoka Basho-fu Preservation Society received recognition as a National Important Intangible Cultural Property, and the Society’s representative, Toshiko Taira, went on to become recognized as a Living National Treasure in 2000.

Producer’s association: Kijoka Bashofu Cooperative Association

 

芭蕉布着物 ゴーマーイー | Bashofu Kimono ”Gomai”

Kimono
Year made:1988
Maker: Toshiko Taira

Technique: Hand-spun kasuri, plant-dyed
Fabric:Hand twisted Banana fiber thread, plant-dye

Gomai is a typical Kasuri pattern of kijoka-bashofu. Kasuri is a fabric that has been woven with dyed fibers to create patterns and images. Gomai means “sitting in a circle,” or “placing things in a circle,” and the pattern is an abstract expression of such a scene. The techniques ranging from ikat binding, weaving of consecutive patterns, and making basho threads of uniform thickness all require an extremely high level of skill. This work was produced by Toshiko Taira, a Living National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.

芭蕉布八寸帯地「黄地絽織縞」 | Basho-fu (Banana fiber) Hassun Obi Cloth “Yellow Striped Silk Weave”

Obi
Year made: 2016
Maker: Toshiko Taira

Technique: Hand-spun kasuri, plant-dyed
Fabric:Hand twisted Banana fiber thread
Certificate: Okinawa Prefecture Textile Inspection Certification
Okinawa Prefecture Certification (Traditional Crafts)

This yellow – the color of the Ryukyu Dynasty and the sun – was made from a plant dye extracted from the Garcinia subelliptica tree. The obi was made using ro-ori and its width is hassun, the equivalent of about 30 cm. This work was produced by Toshiko Taira, a Living National Treasure of Japan.  National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.

Basho-fu is a typical of cloth unique to Okinawa and was once found all over the country and worn by common people throughout the year as work-wear. The fibers are tough and cool when worn, and were used even in kimonos for special occasions and garments for royal and noble families. In 1974, the Kijoka Basho-fu Preservation Society received recognition as a national important Intangible Cultural Property, and the Society’s representative, Toshiko Taira, went on to become recognized as a Living National Treasure in 2000. In this exhibition, we will present two of Toshiko Taira’s works, the Basho-fu kimono “Gomai” and the obi “Yellow Striped Silk Weave”

 


Shuri Ori | 首里織

In the 15th century, Shuri, the thriving capital of the Ryukyu Kingdom, was strongly influenced by southern countries and China. In this region, unique textiles such as Kasuri, Hana-ori, Roton-ori, Hanakura-ori and Minsa were woven. Shuri-ori is prized for its design, which is thought to embody both an air of royal refinement and a feeling of warmth.

Producer’s association; Naha Traditional Textile Cooperative Association

 

首里道屯織 着尺 | Shuri Roton-ori Kimono Fabric

Kimono
Year made: 2013
Maker: Yukari Uema

Technique: Shuri hanakura-ori
Fabric: Silk threads
Certificate: Okinawa Prefecture Textile InspectionCertification
Okinawa Prefecture Certification (Traditional Crafts)

The weaving technique of Shuri Roton-ori originated in China, but was brought to Okinawa in the 17th century. This textile is fully reversible, with warp threads forming patterns on both sides. Upper-class men mainly wore it on formal occasions.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.   National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.  National Treasure of Japan.  National Treasure of Japan.  National Treasure of Japan.  National Treasure of Japan.

首里花倉織 着尺 | Shuri hanakura-ori Kimono

Kimono
Year made: 2013
Maker: Yukari Uema

Technique: Shuri hanakura-ori
Fabric: Silk threads
Certificate: Okinawa Prefecture Textile Inspection Certification Okinawa Prefecture Certification (Traditional Crafts)

Shuri Hanakura-ori is a patterned textile using a checked-mark Hana-ori and Ro-ori. In the Ryukyu Kingdom, it was the most valuable of all textiles, exclusively made for the royal family.  All such textiles from the time are lost, except for one in the Japan Folk Crafts Museum. However, the technique has been passed down and Hanakura-ori fabrics for kimono and obi can now be reproduced.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.

首里花織 帯 | Shuri hana-ori obi

Obi Fabric
Year made: 2014
Maker: Yukiko Yamashiro

Technique: Shuri hana-ori
Fabric: Silk threads
Certificate: Okinawa Prefecture Textile Inspection Certification
Okinawa Prefecture Certification (Traditional Crafts)

Hana-ori was used for garments worn by upper-class men during the Ryukyu Kingdom era. This work is made using the Yashirami Hana-ori technique, which creates fine striped patterns that appear three dimensional, woven with multi-colored threads. It is modeled after a kimono owned by the Japan Folk Crafts Museum. The appeal of this kimono is that the colors, such as red, yellow, blue, green and beige, are all arranged in a highly well balanced manner.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.       

The kasuri-ori and mon-ori patterns that were passed on to the city Shuri and are collectively known as shuri-ori. Shuri, a city that flourished as the capital of the Ryukyu Kingdom, was influenced by China and southern countries and brought about a unique style of weaving. It is said that the weaving techniques were passed down through royal refined design and extravagant coloring. In this exhibition, we will introduce the Shuri Roten-ori, which features beautiful embellishments and was once used to make noblemen’s clothing. We will also show the Shuri Hanakura-ori in its beautiful vermillion with floating embroidery, which was loved by noblewomen.

 


Ryukyu Kasuri | 琉球絣

In the year 1611, Ryukyu Kasuri began with the introduction of cottonseeds and weaving skills from Satsuma Province. There are over 600 types of geometric patterns possible in this textile, many of which portray scenes of nature and everyday life. Made with cotton and hemp thread, Ryukyu Kasuri is known for its simple and noble style.

Producer’s association: Ryukyu Kasuri Cooperative Association

 

琉球絣藍染め着物 敷瓦(シチガーラー) | Ryukyu Kasuri Aizome Kimono “Shichigaara (Tile-pattern)”

Kimono
Year made: Circa.1980
Maker: Seiei Oshiro

Technique: Plain weave, Kasuri
Fabric: Silk thread

Shichigaara is the word for “tiles” in the Ryukyuan language. Checkered designs are created using small and large kasuri patterns. In the large check pattern, smaller checks, eyebrows and flowing water patterns are expressed, requiring very high skill levels. This work was produced by the Oshiro family, who has been engaged in Kasuri production for three generations. National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.

琉球絣 ユタマーノカシアヤー、ミミチキトーニー |Ryukyu-kasuri “Yutama no Kashiaya, Mimichikitoni Pattern

Kimono Fabric
Year made: 2016
Maker: Seiei Oshiro

Technique: Hand-woven, print
Fabric: Silk threads
Certificate: Okinawa Prefecture Textile Inspection Certification
Okinawa Prefecture Certification (Traditional Crafts)

This work is a summer obi fabric of distinctive lightness and cool appearance. The artist originally created this refreshing abstract pattern by adding his modern sensibilities to the patterns in Miezu-cho, an official pattern book of the Ryukyu Kingdom. National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.

Haebaru, an area that produces Ryukyu-kasuri, has been known toproduce kasuri since the Ryukyu Kingdom era. The colorful patterns, of which there are over 600 types, are distinct. Many of the patterns represent the lifestyle and nature environment and have a certain simplicity and nobility. In this exhibition, we will share example of the shikigaware pattern, which has completely within simplicity, as well as the beautiful and refreshing yutamanokashiaya pattern.

 


Chibana Hanaori | 知花花織

In the former Misato village, Chibana Hana-ori was woven for clothing of festivals and formal occasions using technologies and techniques that were well established by the late 19th century. While much Hana-ori expresses raised designs horizontally, Chibana Hana-ori features raised vertical designs.

Producer’s association : Chibana Hanaui Cooperative Association

 

 知花花織経浮花織木綿藍染布地 – Warp float Hana ori on Aizome in cotton

Fabric for general- purpose
Year made: 2016
Maker:-

Technique: Warp float hana-ori
Fabric:Cotton threads, Ryukyu indigo

Warp float hana-ori is a technique distinctive to Chibana Hana-ori. Kimono with this pattern are worn during the usudeku dance, which is performed as a prayer for good health and harvests in the Chibana area. For this reason, the pattern itself is also called usudeku. The background of the textile is dyed with indigo.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. Treasure of Japan.


Yuntanza Hanaui | 読谷山花織

Originating in the 15th century, Yuntanza Hanaui (Hana-ori) was once designated the official textile of the royal administration of Ryukyu and the common people outside of Yomitan were not permitted to wear it. It is a tropical textile made from silk and cotton thread. Geometric patterns are expressed with dyed yarn, then further decorated with striped, checked and/or kasuri splashed patterns.

Producer’s association: Yuntanza Hanaui Cooperative Association

 

読谷山花織 着物 紫 | Yuntanza hananaui Kimono purple

kimono
Year made: 1996
Maker: –

Technique:weft-float hana-ori textiles
Fabric:raw silk threads, cotton threads

The distinctive patterns of Yuntanza Hanaui (Hana-ori) are called Jinbana, Ojibana, Kajimaya. These patterns are woven into the fabric using threads of various colors, such as red, yellow and green. Jinbana is a coin pattern, symbolizing wealth. Ojibana is a Japanese folding-fan pattern that symbolizes prosperity of descendants. And Kajimaya is a pinwheel pattern that symbolizes longevity.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.


Kumejima Tsumugi | 久米島紬

Kumejima Tsumugi, Okinawa’s oldest form of tsumugi weaving, originated 500 years ago with the introduction of silkworm husbandry techniques from China. Applying characteristics of the region, Kumejima Tsumugi is reproduced preserving traditional techniques such as the use of vegetable and mud dyes as well as cloth beating. It is highly valued for both its durability and comfort.

Producer’s association: Kumejima Tsumugi Cooperative Association

 

久米島紬 井絣ゴーマー十字5玉 | Kumejima tsumugi Patterned with Five Igasuri Goma Crosses

Kimono fabric
Year made: 2015
Maker: Katsuhide Arakaki

Technique:
Fabric: Raw silk thread and hand spun floss silk
Certificate: Okinawa Prefecture Textile Inspection Certification
Okinawa Prefecture Certification (Traditional Crafts)

The artist has 40 years of experience as a weaver and is nationally recognized as a Traditional Craftsman. He is also a member of the National Intangible Cultural Properties Conservation Organization. His work is made using traditional mud dyeing techniques and patterned with kasuri patterns called Igasuri, jujigasuri (crosses), and Goma. There are five kasuri patterns arranged in each horizontal row throughout the textile. Because the fabric is fully kasuri patterned using three different colors, brightness and gorgeousness is also expressed in the overall subdued tone. Exquisite kasuri pattern like this implies the artist’s superb skill and his long career as a weaver.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.


Miyako Jofu | 宮古上布

Miyako Jofu originated in the late 16th century when wild-growing ramie was used for weaving. This style employs thin threads and fine kasuri splashed patterns and is made using traditional methods such as indigo dyeing, thread twisting and hand weaving. It is valued as a high-quality, navy blue fine fabric that is representative of materials for summer kimono. It received the first prize in the World Peace Exposition in 1921 and the silver prize in the World Exposition held in Brussels, Belgium in 1957.

Producer’s association: Miyako Textile Cooperative Association

 

宮古上布 七宝柄 | Miyako Jofu Cloisonne pattern Kimono

Kimono
Year made: Before WWII
Maker: –

Technique: Plain weave, Ryukyu indigo dye
Fabric:Hand twisted ramie thread

This kimono has a gloss as though it were covered with wax. It is a fine and typical Miyako Jofu piece. Cloisonne means seven treasures – such as gold, silver, lapis lazuli, and agate. This pattern is a traditional Japanese design; the consecutive circle pattern symbolizes a wish for peace and harmony and is believed to bring good luck.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.

 


Yaeyama Jofu | 八重山上布

The origin of Yaeyama Jofu is unknown. According to historical records, it was presented to Satsuma Province in the early 17th century as tribute. With ramie as the base material, Kasuri splashed pattern is either handwoven or brush printed. For dyeing, vegetable dyes such as Ryukyu indigo and Kuuru (dioscorea cirrhosa) are used. It is a fine textile for the summer season in which Kasuri splashed patterns are typically expressed on white cloth.

Producer’s association: Ishigaki Textile Cooperative Association

 

八重山上布 縦縞トリ緯絣5玉 | Yaeyama Jofu

Kimono fabric
Year made: 2016
Maker: Sachiko Takamine

Technique: Yaeyama Jofu
Fabric: Ramie and hand-twisted ramie thread
Certificate: Okinawa Prefecture Textile Inspection Certification

This fine work is a typical Yaeyama Jofu known as Shiro Jofu, literally meaning white Jofu (high quality cloth).   The fabric is distinctive for its dark brown Kasuri pattern on white ground. Stripes and a cross pattern placed vertically and a bird pattern placed horizontally make up the design of this kimono fabric. The techniques used for this fabric are traditional kasuri weaving, hand spinning and softening by cloth- beating.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.


Yaeyama Hanaori Minsa | 八重山花織ミンサー

The origin of Yaeyama Minsa is unknown. Kasuri splashed textile is made from cotton thread dyed with vegetable dyes such as Indian indigo, Ryukyu indigo, Fukugi (Garcinia spicata) and Kuuru (Dioscorea cirrhosa). Yaeyama Minsa is a type of warp rib weave. This textile is mainly used to produce Obi (sashes for kimono), ties and bags, to all of which it gives a tropical brightness. Alternating five-and-four square Kasuri design means “wishing we will be together for eternity.”

Hana-ori Minsa is a type of weaving which was created in 1989 by the director of the Yaeyama Hana-ori Textile Cooperative Association. She revived the long lost Hana-ori technique and incorporated it into Minsa weaving.

Producer’s association: Yaeyama Hanaori Textile Cooperative Association

 

八重山花織 帯 6玉いつよ柄入り花合わせ | Yaeyama hana-ori Obi

Obi fabric
Year made: 2016
Maker: Shigeko Gushiken, Sachiko Takamine

Technique: Yaeyama Hana-ori
Fabric: silk threads, cotton threads
Certificate: Ishigaki City Reccomendation Certificate

This obi fabric is woven with silk warp and cotton weft. Six minsa patterns (four or five square dots) are arranged horizontally, fully in the fabric. Flower motifs are designed on the top and bottom of the obi.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.


Yonaguni Ori | 与那国織

Yonaguni island is located in the westernmost part of Japan on the border. The origin of Yonaguni-ori is unknown. However, records of its production dating back to the end of the 15th century have been found. There are four weaving types: Yonaguni Dutati (striped textile), Yonaguni Hana-ori, Yonaguni Kaganubu (Minsa), and Yonaguni Shidati (hand towel). The materials used are silk thread, cotton thread and hemp thread colored with local vegetable dyes. The textiles developed in the environment and culture of Yonaguni Island are simple and plain as to convey a feeling of practical beauty. Producer’s association: Yonaguni Traditional Textile Cooperative Association.

Producer’s association: Yonaguni Traditional Textile Cooperative Association

 

与那国花織 網花(よなぐにはなういあんばな) | Yonaguni hanaori “ANBANA (Flower Net)”

Kimono Fabric
Year made: 2016
Maker: Satomi Nagahama

Technique: Yonaguni Hanaui
Fabric: Silk threads
Certificate: Okinawa Prefecture Textile Inspection Certification

Little flowers “花”are incorporated into this checkered (mesh) pattern“網”. Hana-ori is a pre-dyed float weaving. The designs are often geometric combinations of shapes, such as rhombuses. The number of figures called “hana (flower)” forming the pattern determine the name of the design, and that becomes the category for the fabric. The patterns are often combined with checks or stripes. National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan.National Treasure of Japan. National Treasure of Japan.


Ujizome(Sugarcane dyed textiles) | ウージ染め

“Tomigusuku City Ujizome” which is developed for the village renewal project, is a dyed textile using Okinawan specialty sugarcane leaves as dyes. It has a strong image as a special regional product and is expected to contribute to regional vitalization.

〈dyeing〉 hemp cloth, silk cloth and cotton cloth
〈weaving〉 silk thread, cotton thread and hemp thread

Producer’s association: Tomigusuku City Ujizome Cooperative Association